Dakota imprisoned at Fort Snelling

For six days beginning November 7, 1862, about 1,700 Dakota people—mostly women and children—who had surrendered but had not been sentenced to death or prison, were removed from the Lower Sioux Agency to a concentration camp along the river below Fort Snelling. Posted to YouTube by the Minnesota Historical Society, May 6, 2013.

Dakota elder Vernell Wabasha talks about the Jeffers Petroglyphs site

Dakota elder Vernell Wabasha talks about the Jeffers Petroglyphs site. Posted to YouTube by the Minnesota Historical Society on April 23, 2009.

American Indian Movement (AIM) button

American Indian Movement (AIM) button

American Indian Movement (AIM) button recognizing the eighty-three years between the massacre of Lakota people by the US government at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, and the occupation of the same site by AIM members in 1973.

Gun salute during the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Wounded Knee occupation

American Indian Movement (AIM) members honor those who died in the Wounded Knee occupation with a gun salute. Photograph by Jon Lurie, 1998. Used with the permission of Jon Lurie.

AIM members observing the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Wounded Knee occupation

AIM members observing the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Wounded Knee occupation

AIM members gather at Wounded Knee to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Wounded Knee occupation (1973) in South Dakota. Photograph by Jon Lurie, 1998. Used with the permission of Jon Lurie.

 Upside-down American flag flying at Wounded Knee

Upside-down American flag flying at Wounded Knee

An American Indian Movement (AIM) flag flies at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, 1998. AIM members adopted the upside-down US flag, a signal of distress, as a symbol of their movement. Photograph by Jon Lurie, 1998. Used with the permission of Jon Lurie.

Camp at Wounded Knee

Camp at Wounded Knee

The American Indian Movement flag flies over a camp of tipis at Wounded Knee, South Dakota. Photograph by Jon Lurie, 1998. Used with the permission of Jon Lurie.

Clyde Bellecourt and others at Wounded Knee

Clyde Bellecourt and others at Wounded Knee

Clyde Bellecourt addresses the twenty-five-year commemoration of the AIM occupation of Wounded Knee, South Dakota. Photograph by Jon Lurie, 1998. Used with the permission of Jon Lurie.

Clyde Bellecourt and Dennis Banks

Clyde Bellecourt and Dennis Banks

Clyde Bellecourt (left) and Dennis Banks (right) field calls from reporters at Pine Ridge Tribal Headquarters. Photograph by Jon Lurie, 1998. Used with the permission of Jon Lurie.

American Indian Movement button

American Indian Movement (AIM) button

American Indian Movement (AIM) button from the AIM powwow held at the Minneapolis American Indian Center, December 29, 1990.

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