Color image of a Gedney's Pantry Pickles label, c.1935.

Gedney's Pantry Pickles label

Gedney's Pantry Pickles label, c.1935.

Gedney Foods Company

The official source of "the Minnesota Pickle" and creators of the State Fair pickle line, Gedney Foods is an iconic Minnesota company, with products distributed throughout the Midwest. Founded in 1880, Gedney continues to grow one of the more successful pickle brands in the United States.

Black and white Photo print of the steamboats Itasca and War Eagle at the St. Paul levee, 1859.

Steamboats Itasca and War Eagle at St. Paul levee

Photo print of the steamboats Itasca and War Eagle at the St. Paul levee, 1859.

Oil on canvas painting of Charles W. Borup, 1856. Borup was a cautious investor and partner in the St. Paul Bank Borup and Oakes. After the panic ruined him financially he jumped from a bridge into the Mississippi River.Oil on canvas painting of Charles W. Borup, 1856. Borup was a cautious investor and partner in the St. Paul bank Borup and Oakes. After the panic ruined him financially he jumped from a bridge into the Mississippi River.

Charles W. Borup

Oil on canvas painting of Charles W. Borup, 1856. Borup was a cautious investor and partner in the St. Paul bank Borup and Oakes. After the panic ruined him financially he jumped from a bridge into the Mississippi River.

The Financial Panic of 1857

Minnesota Territory experienced a boom period starting in 1855. Industry flourished region-wide and companies amassed incredible wealth. The Financial Panic of 1857 brought the good times to a halt and interrupted the growth of the fledgling state.

Black and white photograph of the K. J. Taralseth Company Building, 1915. Originally published in Warren Sheaf, September 1, 1915.

K. J. Taralseth Co. Warren's Greatest Department Store

The K. J. Taralseth Company Building, 1915. Originally published in Warren Sheaf, September 1, 1915.

Black and white photograph of Knud J. Taralseth, 1915. Originally published in Warren Sheaf, September 1, 1915.

Knud J. Taralseth

Knud J. Taralseth, 1915. Originally published in Warren Sheaf, September 1, 1915.

Color image of the K. J. Taralseth Company Building, Marshall County, c.2002.

K. J. Taralseth Company, Marshall County

K. J. Taralseth Company Building, Marshall County, c.2002.

K. J. Taralseth Company

The K.J. Taralseth Company building is a physical reminder of the early commercial development of Warren. After moving from a brick store that was destroyed by fire in 1910, Ralph Taralseth built a new store that reflected the company's success. The new building carried a mixed product line for which the company became known. It also provided space for the professional services and fraternal organizations forming in and around Warren.

Black and white photograph of Henry Mower Rice, 1863.

Henry Mower Rice

Henry Mower Rice, 1863. Rice was deeply involved in the Ho-Chunk removal to Long Prairie. Though trusted by many Ho-Chunk, he used their situation for political and monetary gain.

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