Caricature of Wanda Gág

Print based on a pencil-drawn caricature of Wanda Gág made by Adolph Dehn in 1916. The Dehn drawing is reproduced in Gág's Growing Pains: Diaries and Drawings for the Years 1908–1917 (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1984). Used here by permission of the Trustees of the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, 2013.

Lithograph on paper by Wanda Gág, 1930.

Lithograph by Wanda Gág

Lithograph on paper by Wanda Gág, 1930.

Photograph of Wanda Gág with a poster she submitted in a contest, 1914.

Wanda Gág

Photograph of Wanda Gág with a poster she submitted in a contest, 1914.

Photograph of Wanda Gág at the age of about three, c.1896.

Wanda Gág as a child

Photograph of Wanda Gág at the age of about three, c.1896.

Photograph of Wanda Gág in 1928.

Wanda Gág

Photograph of Wanda Gág in 1928.

Gág, Wanda (1893–1946)

Wanda Gág (rhymes with "cog") was determined to be an artist, and ultimately she triumphed. Her talent steered her through family hardship and hesitant early artistic efforts until she created Millions of Cats, her beloved 1928 children's book. It has never been out of print.

Photograph of an office of the Northwestern Express Company, the reorganized Minnesota Stage Company, in Deadwood, South Dakota, c.1880.

Northwestern Express Company

Photograph of an office of the Northwestern Express Company, the reorganized Minnesota Stage Company, in Deadwood, South Dakota, c.1880.

Portrait of James C. Burbank, a founding member of the Minnesota Stage Company, c.1872.

James C. Burbank

Portrait of James C. Burbank, a founding member of the Minnesota Stage Company, c.1872.

Front cover of the July 1922 issue of <em>Captain Billy's Whiz Bang</em>.

Captain Billy's Whiz Bang, July 1922

Front cover of the July 1922 issue of Captain Billy's Whiz Bang.

Captain Billy's Whiz Bang

Captain Billy's Whiz Bang was one of the most popular and notorious humor magazines of the 1920s. It was created by Wilford Hamilton Fawcett, who had been a captain in the U.S. Army during World War I and gained the nickname Captain Billy. Fawcett would later tell reporters that he had started his magazine to give the doughboys—as World War I servicemen were popularly called—something to laugh about.

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